ETP students holding compost

Types of Applied Learning

Applied Learning Definition

Applied learning refers to an educational approach whereby students learn by engaging in direct application of skills, theories and models. Students apply knowledge and skills gained from traditional classroom learning to hands-on and/or real-world settings, creative projects or independent or directed research, and in turn apply what is gained from the applied experience to academic learning. The applied learning activity can occur outside of the traditional classroom experience and/or be embedded as part of a course.

(Source: State University of New York)

Applied Learning Types

 

Applied Learning Type

Programs/Course-based

Examples 

(Subject to change depending on section, resources, partner availability etc.)

Capstone Project

Capstone projects are undertaken by students as a culminating activity within their credential. No new discipline knowledge is introduced, rather students further develop professional skills such as problem-solving, written and oral communication, leadership, teamwork, etc. Students demonstrate proficiency, through the application of knowledge and skills acquired in their program, to a specific problem or issue often in partnership with industry, or in service to the community.

Course-based Research

Course-based research projects are more applied than theoretical, but theory informs the work that is being done. It can comprise a component of a course, or occupy an entire course depending upon the complexity of the project and its ability to contribute to the achievement of program learning outcomes. Ideally it will involve interaction/partnership with industry, community organizations or the public.

Course-based Activities

Students apply knowledge and skills gained from traditional classroom learning to hands-on and/or real-world settings, creative projects, and in turn apply what is gained from the applied experience to academic learning. The applied learning activity can occur outside of the traditional classroom experience and/or be embedded as part of a course.

Trades foundation programs (pre-apprenticeship & employment preparation)

Specific examples:

Field experience

Fieldwork provides scheduled hours of activities intended to give students hands-on experience. This instructional setting is characterized by:

Activities in which students are provided with instruction and are directly supervised by college staff in settings outside or inside college facilities in which individual students are required to use instructional equipment and/or supplies.

These settings do not include situations in which computer labs are used for core instruction or situations in which laboratories and workshops are used for convenience.

Lab experience

Provides students with the opportunity to engage with science, research, simulated patients (including other students acting as patients) in ways that professionals do. Offers education in patient care, training in observation, prompts the consideration and application of detailed and contextualized information.

  • Simulation Labs in HHS
  • Science Labs in A&S
  • Tech Labs
  • Interactive Media Developer

Performance-Based Learning

Where students are extensively involved in large-scale public performances and productions and gain end-to-end, broad-based experience. For example, a full production of a stage play, concert or musical theatre.

Service Learning

Service Learning integrates meaningful community service with classroom instruction and critical reflection to enrich the learning experience and strengthen communities. In practice, students work in partnership with a community-based organization to apply their disciplinary knowledge to a challenge identified by the community.

Work Integrated Learning

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship is an agreement between a person (an apprentice) who wants to learn a skill and an employer who needs a skilled worker. The employer sponsors the apprentice and provides paid related practical experience under the direction of a certified journeyperson in a work environment conducive to learning the tasks, activities and functions of a skilled worker. Apprenticeship combines about 80% at-the-workplace experience with 20% technical classroom training, and depending on the trade, takes about 2-5 years to complete. Both the workplace experience and the technical training are essential components of the learning experience.

Trades

Co-op

Consists of alternating academic terms and paid work terms. Work terms provide experience in a workplace setting related to the student’s field of study. The number of required work terms for a Co-op designation varies by program; however, the time spent in work terms must be at least 30% of the time spent in academic study for programs over 2 years in length (e.g. 3 work terms for a 4-year degree) and 25% of time for programs 2 years and shorter in length (e.g. 1 work term for a 2-year diploma).

Co-operative Education and Career Services

Specific examples:

Internship

Internships are usually one work term, discipline-specific (typically full-time), supervised, structured, paid or unpaid, for academic credit or practice placement. Internships may occur in the middle of an academic program, or after all academic coursework has been completed and prior to graduation. Internships can be of any length but are a minimum of 300 hours.

Programs with an Internship

Specific examples:

Supervised Practice

Involves work experience under the supervision of an experienced registered or licensed professional (e.g. preceptor) in any discipline that requires practice-based work experience for professional licensure or certification. Practicums are generally unpaid and, as the work is done in a supervised setting, typically students do not have their own workload/caseload.

AET student placements with team/program or the public at the PISE gym/clinic.