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Information • February 18, 2021 11:10 am • COVID-19 Safety Training & Screening for students • Read more…

Savannah Barratt

Sustainability Consultant

Savannah Barratt is a geography student, and future computer network engineering student at Camosun College, who works three part-time jobs and leads social justice activities in the community. “I really like the idea of versatility, and tying my education to where my passions are,” says Savannah. A former youth in care, and recipient of the B.C. Government’s Provincial Tuition Waiver Program, Savannah doesn’t let the past define her.  At 13, she suddenly suffered the onset of debilitating neurological and mental health illnesses and within a year, went from living at home to being institutionalized and using a wheelchair. Until the age of 20, she was either living in institutions or group homes. “A couple of years ago, though, I began to heal and to right my life, I enrolled at Camosun and got involved in community actions, with groups such as Climate Justice Victoria.” "I looked at the College, and saw a space that I could fit into." 

Savannah now looks towards rehabbing out of her wheelchair and an exciting blended career as a technical geographer or sustainability consultant, combining her unique academic strengths and passion for climate action. “I’ve survived long enough to be able to come out on the other side, and now I’ve learned to thrive again,” she says. “Camosun has given me the freedom to choose where I want to go. Camosun is possibility.”



 

Solomon Lindsay

Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology – Renewable Energy

Solomon Lindsay started at Camosun College younger than most students. Through Camosun’s dual-credit program, facilitated by the South Island Partnership, Solomon was able to get started on his education journey while still in Grade 12. Now an alumnus of Camosun’s Electronics and Computer Engineering Technology – Renewable Energy diploma program and the Engineering Bridge program, Solomon is now starting his third year in the University of Victoria’s Engineering Faculty.

Like many students, paying for school was always a challenge but Solomon was able to access scholarships and financial aid through Camosun to ease the fiscal pain. The Co-op portion of his program, while providing invaluable work experience, also helped him pay his way through school. Camosun was also there when tragedy struck in his second year when Solomon’s brother passed away due to a fentanyl overdose. He credits the college community, including his instructors and classmates, in helping and supporting him through this difficult time. The tragic life-experience Solomon experienced changed him in many ways. But he says, Camosun College supported him and helped open up new experiences, new people, and new possibilities for his future.


Keo Tran in the workplace.

Keo Tran

Hospitality Entrepreneur

Camosun College’s Management student, Keo Tran, is on her way to being a true Hospitality Entrepreneur. As an international post-degree diploma student, she’s already had a career in marketing and events working in several countries including the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, China and now Canada. Originally from Vietnam, Keo’s former boss suggested that she continue to learn and upgrade her skills to help advance her career. Keo admits it was a difficult decision to make to come back to school in her 30s.

The transition from working full-time to becoming a full-time student was challenging at first, as was the new experiences of life in Canada and Victoria. The “friendly studying environment”, “great instructors”, and the “real, hands-on experiences” she’s gained through Camosun has given Keo a strong foundation to explore her future path. She now sees how she can make the industry more sustainable and herself more successful. Having been accepted to several post-secondary schools, Keo says if she had the chance to make the decision again, she would choose Camosun College every time.

Darrell Wright

Adventure Education

As a school principal, Darrell Wright, was struggling to find the job satisfaction he wanted so he decided to return to the classroom to try to rekindle the passion he had lost. Darrell saw an opportunity to reinvent himself and build a program that would benefit his students. “I asked myself what my passion was and what I thought could be of some real value in the education system,” says Darrell. He searched for a program that was flexible, rigorous, experiential and innovative, and found all that in Adventure Education, a Post-Degree diploma program at Camosun College. The program shook Darrell’s understanding of what outdoor experiential education is, challenged him to reflect on what he was doing as an educator, and to organize adventure in a way that it met the needs of his students.

Online learning prepared him with innovative thoughts and questions and the residencies gave Darrell the practice which allowed him to plan his own program development. He credits the Adventure Education instructors for supporting and prodding him to go deeper into his passion and providing the tools to question his assumptions and actions. The most powerful experience for Darrell and his fellow students was in understanding how adventure can be transformative. “The transformations were very individual, but everyone was deeply affected by the learning and experience.”



Fraser McCallum

Information and Computer Systems

Fraser McCallum came to Camosun College because it offered what he was looking for. With courses including Gaming and Graphics, Algorithms and Data Structure, and Mobile App Development, the Information and Computer Systems program helped Fraser explore his interest in programming, a love of problem solving, and goal of becoming a video game software developer. He faced a few challenges before getting started, namely not having all the prerequisite courses needed to be admitted to the program. Fortunately, Camosun offers short, one semester access programs that provide the courses for admission into Camosun’s programs.

Now coming to the end of his first year, Fraser is enjoying the access he has to the resources he and his classmates need. “Our main lab room has 40 workstations fitted with a variety of operating system partitions and hardware,” says Fraser. “It provides the perfect environment to practice programming and administrative skills.” He’s also gained a greater understanding of the technology industry, including what life will be like as an IT professional. “One enlightening aspect that caught my attention was how much working in the IT field is a team-based effort,” says Fraser. “Leadership and communication play critical roles when working on a project with hundreds of individuals each with a unique set of skills.”


The ability to gain new knowledge will be more valuable than the knowledge itself.

You need to be ready for a lifetime of skills training and retraining, in real time.

The pace of change will be so rapid that people need to learn 'in the moment' using new technologies such as augmented reality and virtual reality.

The very nature of work will change. Rather than people chasing jobs, "work will chase people" in virtual real time bidding task board.

In many industries and countries, the most in-demand occupations or specialties did not exist 10 or even five years ago, and the pace of change is set to accelerate.

Knowledge is the currency of the future.

When the world changes this fast, the only way to succeed is to...

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Last updated: February 24, 2021 1:20 pm

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